New issue of Regional Language Studies (No. 25)

RLS 25006Regional Language Studies…Newfoundland was established by William J. Kirwin in 1968. This issue marks the 25th number of RLS and the English Language Research Centre wanted to do something special to celebrate. Though over the years RLS has featured a number of papers dealing with language in Labrador, it has never devoted a full issue to this region of the province.

With the publication of the Innu Language Project’s dictionaries in 2013 and the launch of the Dialect Atlas of Newfoundland and Labrador, the ELRC Management Committee decided to dedicate a special RLS issue to Labrador language studies. This issue contains papers about language in Labrador from Marianne Stopp (Parks Canada), Martha Macdonald (The Labrador Institute), Sandra Clarke (Linguistics), Suzanne Power (ELRC, Centre Manager), Marguerite MacKenzie and Laurel Anne Hasler (Linguistics/Innu Language Project) and Jenna Edwards (Linguistics).

RLS is now available online through Open Journal Systems. To view the current issue, click here or paste the following link in your browser: http://journals.library.mun.ca/ojs/index.php/RLS/issue/current

RLS is still available in hard copy. If you would like to be added to our mailing list, please send your address and request to elrc@mun.ca

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Twig creator, Jenny Higgins, launches new book, Perished!

Big congratulations to Jenny Higgins, former ELRC Manager and Twig creator, on the launch of her new book Perished: The 1914 Newfoundland Sealing Disaster.

The launch is today, Thursday March 20, at Bitter’s Pub from 5-6:30. Everyone is welcome!

Jenny

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New Dialect Atlas promotional video!

Today is the day! Come join us in celebrating the launch of the Dialect Atlas of Newfoundland and Labrador. If you can’t be there and would like more information about the atlas, check out this promotional video created by the wonderful folks at DELTS here at Memorial University. You can view the video on YouTube by clicking here or by pasting the following link into your browser: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=10MSgbnYGjk&feature=youtu.be

Also, please come over to Facebook and like the Dialect Atlas page: https://www.facebook.com/dialectatlas. Hope to see you this afternoon!

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Dialect Atlas of Newfoundland and Labrador Launch!

Please join us on Wednesday October 23rd for the launch of the Dialect Atlas of Newfoundland and Labrador. Reception to follow.

Poster 2

 

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Joan Houston Hall on Weekend AM Sunday September 22nd

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Upcoming George Story Lecture

This fall, the George Story Lecture will be delivered by Joan Houston Hall, Chief Editor of the Dictionary of American Regional English. We’re all very excited to welcome her to Newfoundland and Memorial University. It’s quite fitting to have a lecturer whose work is so closely related to the work of George Story’s. Mark it on your calendar, it will be a fascinating talk.

Untitled-1 copy

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En Français!: French and the DNE

Panoramic view of French Landing on the Newfoundland Island from the west side of Saint Jean [today's St. John's] (around 1762). Bibliothèque et Archives Canada R9266-3250/Collection de Canadiana de Peter Winkworth. Image is public domain.

Panoramic view of French Landing on the Newfoundland Island from the west side of Saint Jean [today's St. John's] (around 1762). Bibliothèque et Archives Canada R9266-3250/Collection de Canadiana de Peter Winkworth. Image is public domain.

August marks the 300th anniversary of the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713. While the Treaty was important internationally for several reasons, article 13 held special significance for Newfoundland, or Terre-Neuve at the time. Under this article, Newfoundland was recognized as a British rather than French possession and France surrendered the fort at Plaisance, now Placentia. Those French settlers then moved off to Cape Breton, but not before retaining the rights to fish the French shore, stretching from Cape Bonavista up and around the northern tip of Newfoundland, then down the western side to Point Riche. This area is also known as the treaty shore. With the exception of a few communities, Newfoundland is fairly Anglophone today. The focus of this Twig entry is on French or French-influenced words in the Dictionary of Newfoundland English. As always, if you’ve got others to share, please drop us a line!

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